Posted in Uncategorized

Pulsera Project Teacher Trip Q & A

This is an update I posted to my GoFundMe for my Pulsera Project Trip. I thought some of you would like to read it, too 🙂

Hi all!
On Thursday evening I hosted a Facebook Live Q & A session, and I got some really great questions about my trip. I decided to host the session because several people have been asking great questions, and I thought this would be an easy way of sharing information about what I’ll be doing. I’ll summarize some of the questions here!
Q: Is your trip with the Pulsera Project a mission trip?
A: No, not really. This is an educational trip for teachers. It is with a non-profit organization that is not affiliated with a religion and focuses it’s efforts both here and in Nicaragua. The work in the U.S. is primarily through service-learning for students and Pulsera sales. I understand the confusion, because I am highly involved in my church. I will say that this organization models what I believe to be a more effective way of meeting needs (which is the true definition of mission work–not to be confused with evangelism). People used to (and sadly some still do) go places and give people stuff, but this is ineffective (watch Poverty Inc documentary for more info). The Pulersa Project is all about educating and empowering people to raise themselves from poverty through sustainable (and fair) work opportunities, micro loans, and education opportunities.

Q: If it isn’t a mission trip, what will you be doing there?
A: A whole lot of things! We are going to be getting an inside look at how the organization works, what they do with the money from pulsera sales, and who they work with. We will be meeting pulsera artists, as well as people from other organizations with similar missions. We are going to be observing the culture, the situations, and the solutions people there are working to formulate. As I mentioned before, a huge part of what the Pulsera project does is education in the U.S., so we (a group of 8 teachers selected from across the country) will also be giving input on new lesson ideas and contributing to that process. Of course there will be some tourism, too. For instance, one night, we will be going to see an active volcano!

Q: Can I fit in your suitcase?
A: No, but I really wish you could! I’m planning to take only carry-on luggage on this trip!

Q: Do you speak Spanish?
A: Yep! That is actually one of the requirements to be selected for the trip! The Pulsera Project has many cross-curricular opportunities, but they primarily work with Spanish Teachers and World-Language departments because the culturally authentic material they produce is primarily in Spanish, of course.

Q: How long is the trip?
A: 8 days!

Q: Is it a large group setting?
A: Nope, not at all. Actually, only 8 teachers in the U.S. were selected for the trip. It will be us, and a few people from the organization.

Q: Will you be sharing information from your trip?
A: YES, YES, AND YES! I plan to share information here and on my blog (cwilsonspanish.com). I hope to share cultural information, information related to teaching, as well as some personal experiences. I plan to keep this page up so that people who have supported this campaign financially and with their thoughts, well-wishes, and prayers can see the results of their generosity.

Q: Will this be your first time in Nicaragua?
A: Yes, it will. I have been to Costa Rica several times, which is just south of Nicaragua, so I am familiar with the climate, however this is my first trip to the country 🙂

Q: What are your goals in Nicaragua?
A: I have several. I would like to positively contribute to the lessons that the Pulsera Project provides. Not only have these lessons positively impacted my students, but my own teaching of them has permanently changed me as an individual as well. On a personal level, I love to learn, so I have a personal goal of learning more about the culture and continuing to improve my Spanish. Lastly, most teachers understand the burn-out you feel in May/ June. I’m looking forward to being re-invigorated by the knowledge that what we do works.

Thank you to everyone who asked questions! And again, thank you to everyone who has supported me in this trip! Stay turned for more updates -C. Wilson

Posted in Uncategorized

Reflection

Today was the English II STAAR EOC (State of Texas) exam for my students, following the English I exam on Tuesday. I’d like to share some reflections.

First, I want to share something from the past. I remember the moment I finally became an elementary teacher. I started in December, taking over a classroom that had been through 2 teachers and several subs. It wasn’t until May that I finally “arrived”. After having worked in Jr. High and High School, no part of me wanted to work in an elementary school… and it did not suit me. I took the job because it was what I could get mid-year, in a new state. One day we had a book parade, and my class rocked it. We chose the perfect book: The Very Hungry Caterpillar. I bought 1 poster board per student. I drew foods on each one, and had each kid cut a whole in the middle. They got acrylic paints and did made patchy 2nd grade masterpieces on them. It was perfection. We made a caterpillar, and I ended the line as the butterfly. We could tell the entire story with our class–from beginning to end. As we walked by the other classes, one teacher leaned over and said, “You ARE an elementary teacher.” I actually cried.

After that year, I returned to high school–back to my homeland. But, I was not unchanged. Every class I teach will forever be stamped by what I did there in those few months, with those sweet 2nd-grade souls.

On this blog I have often reflected on the fact that no matter what I teach, I am a teacher. But, today, in the midst of a light-hearted discussion with my principal, in which I reminded him that I’d love to teach Spanish again one day, and

he politely reminded me that that will never happen. This is partly because he already has a Spanish teacher, and partly because even if he didn’t, he wouldn’t let me teach it. More specifically, he wouldn’t let me stop teaching English.

He can see what I could not. He already sees me as an English teacher, when I’m still desperate to reject that label altogether. While I still have my preferences, the truth is that I am an English teacher.

On that note, when my students take big tests like this, I tend to believe their results say more about me than they do about the students. As the tests approach, I pray the results reflect what the kids have learned. I pray that even if they don’t pass, they at least grow from where they were last year. I pray that I did them justice. They deserve so much, and I hope I did what I could to get them where they need to be.

Last reflection: Many people comment about the “fun” we’ll have now that we can “let our hair down” after the test. UMMMMM. A.) We were having fun before. B.) We aren’t going to switch to a blow-off curriculum after the test. I saved this last 6 weeks for the real fun: research! YES. We cannot ignore those TEKS just because they aren’t tested.

-CL

Posted in classroom management, English escapades, teaching

Teaching is 1 part instruction and 3 parts making your students think you are weird.

I spend a lot of time here on the instruction in my classroom, but the reality is that teaching is mostly about relationships. The truth is that kids decide if they want to learn from their teachers. My job is to invest in them in such a way that they come in and are willing to hear me out and do what I ask of them. If I can do that, I’ll be able to facilitate learning experiences. If I can do that, they’ll be able to learn something about themselves. If I can do that, they’ll be empowered. One of the ways that I invest in my kids is by being human. (Un)Fortunately for them, I’m an odd human.

So, today, one of my students made critical mistake. He asked the age-old question: “Mrs. W., why don’t you have a clock in your classroom?”

Poor kid. I very loudly began to proclaim an honest but dramatized response.

Me: I don’t have a clock because I don’t like time.

S: You don’t like time?

Me: What you don’t realize is that time is a social construct created by society to imprison us within the confines of the clock.

S: **incredulous look**

Me: That anxiety you feel when you can’t tell how long we have left in class? That is your addiction to the imprisonment you’ve been brought up to admire, creeping up to wrap you in its grasp once again.

Ss: **more incredulous looks**

Me: You know why I don’t have a clock? I like to teach. I like to teach without a constant reminder that “society” has decided I only have 45 minutes to instill a love of knowledge in my students and fill the gaps created by years of education you missed while you were staring at the clock, wondering when the bell would ring and your enslaved selves would be obliged to move to the next required learning experience. I like the freedom I feel when I teach despite the bell. In spite of it. It is the same freedom that scares you when you search my walls and don’t find your familiar oppressor there, reigning you in once again.

Ss: **a sudden look of epiphany**

S1: OK, then.

S2: Hmm. Maybe that is why this class always passes so quickly?

Me: Remind me why you guys aren’t working again?

S: Heh. **returns to work**

So, here’s to Thursday, folks.

-CL

 

Posted in English escapades, Lesson plan component

Lesson Planning

As an FYI, the title of this post is what I’m supposed to be doing right now.

At least to some degree, however, I’m struggling. You may have noticed that I’ve switched subject areas, from Spanish to English this school year. This means that at every moment, I’m still evaluating what gaps my students have, and whether or not my approach to teaching a given concept is actually working.

So here I sit: evaluating the last week, mentally combing through my resources, and attempting to corral them into some type of a lesson plan.

If you have a second, send a prayer for me and all the other public education teachers writing LPs right now.

Posted in professional development, teaching

Gravity

I don’t think I ever understood the term “righteous anger” until I became a teacher. I didn’t understand how anger could be good, or productive, until I sat in my classroom and got angry.

I wasn’t angry at my kids. I’ve learned to stop blaming them. They are KIDS. I got angry at systems. Systems that failed them. Systems that didn’t work. Broken systems.

What I’ve come to realize is that many schools/ communities/ organizations/ lawmakers/ etc. do not understand the gravity of education. We (I use “we” here because I catch myself forgetting, often) cannot comprehend the weight of what we do.

I’ve just returned from a couple days at the TCEA Conference/ Convention in Austin, TX, and I left with a feeling that reminded me of how I felt during graduate school.

I was simultaneously elated at my new learning and furious with the injustices my new learning exposed.

The weight I feel is so intense. The only word left to describe it is: Gravity.

-CL

Image By WikiDiego91 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Posted in English escapades, professional development, Spanish relapses, teaching, Tech-ventures

Going Places

It’s funny. When I was a kid, relatives would constantly tell me that I was “going places”. They assumed my smarts and demeanor would take me away from my family and rocket me down some highway to Harvard. They weren’t wrong… but they weren’t right in the way they thought they were going to be, either.

highway

Many teachers face the constant questions about why they became a teacher instead of something else… you know… something that could “take them somewhere”.

I’d beg to differ with them on the point that teaching can’t take a person to new places.Teaching is like learning in that it expands the mind, and it expands perspectives. Teaching takes my mind somewhere new, every day.

In 6 years, I’ve taught at every level of K-12 education. I’ve taught everything from 2nd grade (all subjects) to Beginning Spanish, to AP Spanish Literature, to English, to Math, to basic twitter use for teachers! I’ve done the math… and I’ve taught nearly 1000 students (including my final internship).

I’ve also literally gone places, of course…like the Spanish Spelling Bee in Tampa FL, where my 4 students got completely creamed, but they were ecstatic to go and compete. Like Oak Cliff (Dallas), where I never could get my second graders on a bus to take them somewhere, so I walked them outside to do a lesson on the lawn and shake things up a bit. Like Fort Worth and Desoto, where I took buses full of country kids to read to bilingual students. Like the entire stretch of 287, where I made a 250 mile drive (one way) into a day-trip, just for the fun of it, for a group of seniors who got to see a play–live on stage, and experience a protest, and see modern art.

You know… I don’t always take the kids with me, though.

In San Antonio, I changed direction as a teacher, and it changed my life. I gained a PLN I haven’t let go of since when I joined #langchat. I went on numerous adventures, professionally, and personally–as I took my first solo trip post-motherhood to attend the ACTFL conference in 2014. I ate breakfast tacos, and I didn’t have to share. I celebrated birthdays with friends from other countries. I walked alone down the streets of San Antonio, in the rain, just for fun. I discovered the Pulsera Project and it changed everything. 

In San Diego, I presented at the ACTFL conference. My session didn’t go as planned, and when I started to roll with the punches, the attendees opened up and shared their needs. I threw out my whole plan and started from scratch right there, on the spot. We had an amazing time, and they told me it was the best session they attended that day. I took the fairy to my sessions, and I walked to the convention center each day. I spent my lunch hour at the beach. I got way too close to a seal. I watched a man build the longest hot wheel track I’ve ever seen, while my eyes kept glancing at a homeless man, who was searching a nearby trash can for food. 

In Austin, my face melted. The world is so much bigger than we can imagine, and it is even bigger than ACTFL could help me see. Seeing what was “new” and “next” changed my praxis. Much of what I saw didn’t directly apply to me, but all of it applied to my students. So, instead of trying to jam it all into my class, I came back and tried to share what I could with those around me. I got lost in the convention center. I got every free t-shirt available in the expo hall. I managed to get a free light saber, 2 selfie sticks, and 73 free pens. I tried fried avocado. I made a point of stopping at every Buc-ees between Dallas and Austin. I made life-long friends and true collaborative relationships. 

In Nicaragua this summer, who knows what I’ll experience. I know this for sure: it will be an adventure. 

So. To that person in your life telling you that teaching won’t take you places: they’re wrong. Teaching will expand your mind until it hurts. It will explode your heart until you can’t help but feel every. single. thing. It will challenge your thoughts, opinions, and perspectives, until you become a person who can see many sides to a single situation. It will literally take you outside the four walls of your classroom on many occasions, if you are willing to invest the time it takes to walk out those doors. If you let it, teaching will take you all over the United States, and beyond. If you let it.

-CL

FYI: The picture of the overpass at the top of the post… is from that time I decided to walk from to the airport to my training, just because. Because if you are willing, you can find adventure anywhere. 🙂

Posted in Spanish relapses, teaching

Teachers have many names…

I posted 2 days ago about the amazing opportunity I have been given to travel with the Pulsera Project this summer on their Spanish Teacher Trip to Nicaragua. On my GoFundMe page, I wrote

Teaching, in and of itself, has made me an advocate of all my students, and especially, as a Spanish Speaker, an advocate for my Hispanic students and their families.

Advocate. 

See, teachers have many names. There are posts all over the internet, and posters plastered on many classroom walls about all the roles that teachers play, including: nurse, counselor, parent, judge, comedian, party planner, etc. But the most powerful role I fill is that of an advocate for my students. 

This year I’ve made the strange transition from actively teaching Spanish as a Spanish teacher, to teaching High School English. I have maintained that I am still a Spanish teacher at my core, and this is certainly still true, but being in a core-content area classroom has taught me a lot about what goes on outside of the Foreign Language hallway.

I have always had all types of students in my classroom, but their goals, abilities, and interests were diverse, and the flexible nature of language allowed me to adjust to their needs very fluidly. Teaching a course associated with a State Exam, surrounded with these same students, but with much of the flexibility reduced (not gone) and time constraints imposed,  has opened my eyes further to the needs of my students–especially my Hispanic students, Spanish-speakers, and ELLs.

Before, the very culture of my classroom generally meshed with theirs. The assignments we completed were valuable, even if they came with the native speaker and heritage learner “growing pains” many of us language teachers have to overcome with these kids.

Now, I’m faced with a language of instruction that, in itself, imposes dominance. I can throw these kids a cultural bone with relevant readings or topics, but I can’t fundamentally change the elephant in the room.

I spent five years helping English Speakers understand the concept of the other. 

Now, I’m reminded that the other still exists, and many of my students are part of it.

This whole issue came to a head for me today during a conversation about English Language Learners with a colleague. We discussed the intricacies and complexities involved in deciding if an English Language Learner is Dyslexic, or even in need of Special Education Services. There are so many issues here that I’d need a whole separate space to write about them. I’ll do my best with some bullet points:

  • A test for disabilities given in English to an ELL is inherently flawed, because it would be near impossible to tell if the deficit is cognitive, or linguistic.
  • Tests like these given in Spanish to Native Speakers are often flawed as well, especially if: (1) they are written, as many Spanish Speakers were not formally educated in their country, so they are not literate in the language and (2) the test was written in a dialect other than their own (ex. Spain vs. Mexico).
  • English tests are often given to ELLs because they “speak English”–which is usually not broken down between their BICS (skills for everyday conversation) and their CALP (academic or technical language skills).
  • “Speaking English” is very different from WRITING and READING it. Many student compensate verbally after many years, but remain years behind in writing and writing, which makes them “appear” learning disabled on paper.
  • Placing entire generations of ELLs in Special Education and 504 services is institutional racism, because it equates their language deficit with a cognitive deficit.
  • These students are often underserved. WAY. Underserved.
  • Many students come to school as English Language Learners, but are not able to be identified because their parents are afraid to admit Spanish is spoken in the home.
  • Schools exasperate the problem when they do not have the foresight required to provide community liaison support for these families.

I’m going to have to stop there. I really am. I got pretty fired up today, because while I tried to explain all this, the other person understood, but didn’t really understand. The person cares, as much as I do. But the misunderstandings prevail, and kids get lost in the mix.

So, today, and every day, I’m an advocate. The biggest job of an advocate is to educate. Not only do I educate my kids about the content, but I also work to educate them about themselves. I work to educate those around me. And, I keep repeating myself until someone listens.

I am a teacher. I am an advocate.

-CL

p.s. If you are reading this, please consider supporting my trip with the Pulsera Project, while I seek to continue learning how to best advocate for my students and community.

Posted in Uncategorized

Another adventure!

Hi guys,
I am writing to share this exciting news with you. I found out this afternoon that I have been selected as one of only 8 teachers in the United States to attend this teacher trip to Nicaragua this summer. I have created a GoFuneMe account to help cover the expenses. I understand that not everyone can donate, but I hope you’ll pray for the trip, and consider sharing the link with your friends.
Love you guys. Here’s to another adventure!

https://www.gofundme.com/mrs-wilsons-pulsera-project-trip

Thank you all,

-CL

Posted in Uncategorized

Joy

‘Tis the season for Joy. Today was a great day, and it made my teacher heart cry. Today was one for the highlight reel.

3 years ago, this week, I bought a kid some folders and a backpack. He was a second year freshman, and a pain in my rear. Of course, I taught him 8th period. When else? I bought him the backpack so he couldn’t tell me all the reasons he didn’t have his work any more. That was my snarky reason… But the real reason was because I saw so much in him and I wondered if he’d ever see it in himself. It turns out that just a few years before, he had been at the top of his class: with commended scores on every standardized test, and real dreams. But him mom passed away, and life went on, and he didn’t. My heart hurt for this kid because I’d been there. Except, my downturn lasted 6 months, not almost 6 years.

After many other obstacles in his path and a time of recovering the credits he’d fallen behind in, I learned that he earned the credits necessary to graduate, as of today. He isn’t my son, but I’m just as proud as I know I will be on the day my sons graduate high school. I  haven’t been his teacher in three years, but I’ve never stopped praying for him. So today I cried tears of joy for him, and for the reality that though education is often viewed as a system in shambles, there are places where what we do is working. It worked for this kid, and that makes everything worth it.

-CL

Posted in teaching, Uncategorized

A Teacher’s Christmas List

NO. This isn’t a sappy list about hoping all kids will learn and have a warm jacket for the winter. I DO hope those things, and I pray for them daily. But no. This isn’t that list. This is a real list of stuff you should buy the teachers in your life. Really. For real. Do it.

286727-school-supply-cake-8877a
Photo from: ecycler.com
If you have a teacher in your life, here is what (s)he wants for Christmas:
-A large amount of pencils and pens. Don’t go all out, we are planning to give these away.
-GlueSTICKS. Liquid glue is of the devil, but even high school teachers need glue for their classes.
-Scissors. These little devils grow feet and walk away like none other.
-Scratch and sniff stickers. WE NEED SOMETHING TO LIVE FOR.
-Stamps. Kids will do anything for a stamp, and, apparently, so will we.
-Expo markers and dry erase supplies. Not black, please not black. We need to see color, considering 90% of us don’t have a window to look through.
-Red and/ or colored pens. Nothing gets us going like a new color to grade in.
-Giant Sticky notes (17″X25″) . Most teachers don’t know these exist, which means they don’t know that this is truly the desire of their souls. Help an educator out.
So, if you are wondering, YES. I do want all these things for Christmas. But so does every other certified educator ever. Feel free to share so teachers all over the world can have more than a Merry Christmas, but also a stocked-up New Year.
-CL